• Issued: July 2016
  • Content last reviewed: July 2016

The profiles below show trends in workplace injuries and fatalities in Ontario from 2010 to 2014. These trends provide a critical lens through which to view the effectiveness of the occupational health and safety system in protecting our workers from injury.

For each of the five profiles below, examples are given based on hazard and data availability. For example, construction and manufacturing are two sectors with high workplace hazards so they are featured in two of the graphs below.

Publishing data online for public use on Ontario’s workplace fatalities and injuries allows citizens, businesses, researchers and others to help us solve problems that affect Ontarians every day. This is part of Ontario’s Open Government commitment to make government more open, transparent and accessible.

Traumatic Fatalities in Ontario

From 2010 to 2014, the distribution of traumatic fatalities across the province by age group was relatively stable. On average, 64% of the fatalities occurred in the 25-54 age group, 27% of fatalities occurred in the 55+ age group, and 8% occurred in the 15-24 age group. The only exception was 2013, when the 25-54 and 55+ age groups had proportionally more fatalities than the average of five years for these age groups.

Chart: Traumatic Fatalities in Ontario by Age Group (2010-2014)

Traumatic Fatalities by Age Group (2010-2014)
Year Ages 15-24 Ages 25-54 Ages 55+
2010 6 57 22
2011 7 57 27
2012 9 52 18
2013 4 68 31
2014 9 50 21

Source: Ministry of Labour. Provincial Traumatic Fatalities.

Sector Trend: Allowed Lost-time Injury Rates for Manufacturing vs. All Sectors

The allowed lost-time injury (ALTI) rate in the manufacturing sector decreased steadily from 2010 to 2014. During that five year period, the injury rate in manufacturing was consistently higher than the injury rate for all sectors combined, and all sectors displayed a steady decrease in injury rate.

Chart: Allowed Lost-Time Injury Rates for Manufacturing vs. All Sectors (2010-2014)

Allowed Lost-Time Injury Rates for Manufacturing vs. All Sectors (2010-2014)
Year ALTI Rate for All Sectors
(per 100 workers)
ALTI Rate for Manufacturing
(per 100 workers)
2010 1.01 1.21
2011 0.93 1.13
2012 0.91 1.08
2013 0.87 1.02
2014 0.85 1.00

NOTE: Data maturity for WSIB data: As at March 31st of the year following each injury year.

Sources:

  1. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB).(2015). By the numbers, 2014. (PDF)
  2. Statistics Canada. No Date. Table  282-0008 – Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), CANSIM (database).

Sector Share: Construction vs. All Sectors

In 2014, the construction sector had 11% of the total number of lost-time injuries for all sectors in Ontario. This is higher than its share of WSIB-covered employment (9%), overall employment (7%) and the province’s gross domestic product (6%).

Chart: Construction Sector Share of the Total Economy (2014)

Construction Sector Share of the Total Economy (2014)
Sector Parameters Share of Total in Ontario
Allowed Lost-Time Injuries 11%
Employment 7%
WSIB Covered Employment (FTE basis) 9%
Gross Domestic Product 6%

NOTE: Data maturity for WSIB data: As at March 31st of the year following each injury year.

Sources:

  1. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB).(2015). By the numbers, 2014. (PDF)
  2. Statistics Canada. No Date. Table  282-0008 – Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), CANSIM (database).
  3. Statistics Canada. No Date. Table  379-0028 – Gross domestic product (GDP) at basic prices, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), provinces and territories, annual (percentage share),  CANSIM (database).

Regional Profile: Injuries and Employment in London, Ontario

From 2010 to 2014 employment steadily increased in London, Ontario. Meanwhile, lost-time injuries fluctuated from one year to another with the highest number of injuries in 2010 and the lowest in 2011.

Chart: Injuries and Employment in London, Ontario (2010-2014)

Injuries and Employment in London, Ontario (2010-2014)
Year Number of People Employed (Thousands) Number of Injuries
2010 319 2626
2011 320 2440
2012 323 2590
2013 324 2601
2014 325 2443

NOTE: Data maturity for WSIB data: As at March 31st of the year following each injury year.

Sources:

  1. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB). No Date. Enterprise Information Warehouse.
  2. Statistics Canada. No Date. Table  282-0125 – Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by economic region based on 2011 Census boundaries and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (persons), CANSIM (database).

Priority Profile: Falls From Heights by Sector

From 2010 to 2014, among all industry sectors in Ontario, construction experienced the most lost-time injuries due to falls from heights (26% of the total for all sectors). This was followed by retail (13% of the total), and transportation and warehousing (12% of the total). Falls from heights in construction appear to be increasing each year while falls from heights in the other two sectors decreased overall between 2010 and 2014.

Chart: Allowed Lost-Time Injuries due to Falls from Heights (2010-2014)

Allowed Lost-Time Injuries due to Falls from Heights By Sector (2010-2014)
Year Construction Retail Transportation and Warehousing
2010 668 417 358
2011 704 407 382
2012 682 303 290
2013 739 359 312
2014 744 329 332

NOTE: Data maturity for WSIB data: As at March 31st of the year following each injury year.

Sources:

  1. Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB). No Date. Enterprise Information Warehouse.

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